Beauty

Want Happy

In the Spring of 2012, Michigan Ave. was sported a Gulliver-sized Marilyn Monroe statue in her iconic upwind pose. Other than the "new perspective" tourists had on the blonde beauty, the statue exploded on Social Media.  Instagram photos could be found across the web and the statue truly brought out the "paparazzi" in everyone who came to see Marilyn in all her glory. I had been wanting to photograph the iconic statue for quite some time, but had not been able to find a day that rainy spring where the lighting and timing lined up. Thankfully, one night while walking home from a late night at work, I came across a unique view of the statue. It was in the midst of deconstruction, half-strapped down to a truck, ready to move on from Chicago. Armed only with my iPhone, I had to jump on this last-chance to snap a shot and capture a limited-time shot of the statue before it disappeared forever.

Marilyn was anything if not a chaser of dreams, and the massive statue was a tribute to the enormity of her stature. But what if you clashed the icon of what she represents with the strapped-nature of the statue being torn down. With this in mind, and utilizing the same Instagram programs of the tourists before me, and adding text via Illustrator, I created the following poster - the antithesis of two words - the outer Marilyn & the inner turmoil of the artist.

Want Happy

Want Happy

While exploring this artistic rendition of the Marilyn statue, I was listening to Death Cab for Cutie and a song really stood out in my mind that seemed to call out to the above.  The song is "Tiny Vessels" and along with the Marilyn project, it inspired me to create the following typographical exploration.

she was beautiful-01